Easy DIY – Eraser Stamped Journals

DIY_Eraser Dot Journals_8

I’m in a crafty mood lately, so yesterday I decided to try my hand at the ‘Pinterest-popular’ eraser dot/stamping technique. The basic concept is to use a pencil eraser as your paint brush. The project was fast, easy and since you can wipe the erasers clean…there was very little mess. 

DIY_Eraser Dot Journals_1

Supplies:

– Blank cover notebooks. I used Moleskine Pocket Cahier booklets which come in a set of three.

– Paint in your favorite colors. You can use any type of opaque paint for this project. I used Acrylic paints because that is what I had on hand, but you can use craft paint or even stamp pads for another cool look.

– Classic #2 Pencils with pink erasers. I also tested the dot technique with a Pentel Clik Eraser and some craft Stencil Daubers. All worked, but the yellow pencil/pink eraser provided the best result.

– Paper Towels and a little water for clean up, and small paint brush is helpful for any paint touch-ups you may find necessary.

 

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I decided to do the first notebook with metallic dots. I used the pencil eraser to dot copper dots on first. I found it helpful to keep a small paintbrush on hand to gently tap down any paint that peaked as you can see on some of the dots above. It’s not necessary to do this step, it was just my personal preference.

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I gave the copper dots a minute or so to dry, then I used the same pencil eraser to dot on some gold paint.

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Then I added some silver dots. Since you are using such a small amount of paint, the booklet dries very quickly.

SUCCESS! I love the finished journal!

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While the metallic booklet was drying, I tried using the Pentel Clik eraser to dot the other booklet.

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I used Aqua, Dark Purple, and Silver for this one.

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I didn’t like this finished booklet as much since the Clik Eraser didn’t stamp the paint as cleanly as the Pencil Eraser. You can see the difference in how poorly the purple stamped. That was partly due to the eraser and partly due to the type of paint. The aqua and silver worked just fine so I would recommend testing the paints you choose on a piece of paper before you stamp your final product. I had such good luck with the fist booklet that I didn’t test out the purple paint…but you live and learn.

It’s still pretty in it’s own way and now I have two lovely personalized booklets to write in. Bonus, clean up was a breeze and the whole project was done in less than 20 minutes. These would also make great gifts to the book/journal lover in your life!

 

What DIY Projects have you been working on lately?

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Refreshing A Feature Art Wall

Happy Thursday! I hope everyone’s week is going well.

 

Even though I moved inland 2 years ago, it still amazes me how quickly the weather can change out here. When I lived in Orange County, weather was mild. Now I live an hour inland, and today we went from 100 degrees, hot and sunny to a severe thunderstorm warning. A cloud has literally unzipped over my house. I love the rain so I don’t mind much, but the wind has been causing a bit of havoc and I’ve never heard thunder this loud. Before I realized that the storm had hit, wind caused my blinds to knock over a vase, shattering glass all over my kitchen and living room. Needless to say we’re stuck indoors so it was time to tackle a project that’s been on my list for a while.

[We’re also intermittently losing power so I’m not sure when this post will go up, but hopefully it does post on Thursday. If not, then ummm…HAPPY FRIDAY!]

Months ago I bought a set of numbered art prints from the same person who created the calendar I used in the Letterpress Journal. The artist was doing a deal where you got one print free if you bought two. Since I wanted the the set of three anyway, I went for it. The prints came from France, and with shipping, I think they cost me about $120. Certainly not cheap, but I loved them so much, it was well worth every cent.

 

After spending quite a bit of time staring at blank walls around the house, I decided this little alcove would be the perfect place. This oil painting is pretty, but it just wasn’t working for me.

Custom Art Wall

However, the space is perfect for displaying art since it has a built in lighting. Just imagine I swapped out that ugly yellow lighting for  a pretty chandelier in the near future.

Custom Art Wall

Before I show you the after shots, let’s take a side step. My first job was at Aaron Brothers (an art supply and framing store) as a sales person. I worked there throughout high school and college and over time transitioned to certified framer and later to a key holder. Looking back it has been my favorite job to date, but that’s not really the point. The point is that I cannot bring myself to pay for framing since I know how to do it myself. I’m referring to the matting in particular which can get ridiculously expensive.

Tip: I also know that their penny sales are always in January and July, so if you need multiple frames, pick them up during that sale where you can get the 2nd frame for just a penny. In addition to the three fames for this project, I picked up three more for other projects, and the grand total was just under $100. 6 large frames for $16 each is a great deal when they all were marked at about $40+ each before the sale.

Custom Art Wall

To mat them myself I picked up a 2 full size mat boards, in Ash, from their framing department for $28. For less than $30 I was able to mat all three prints and I’m left with enough scrap for quite a few more prints.

Tip: You can have their framing department cut down the boards to any size you want, usually for free. I had them cut me 3 pieces of 20×28 from the 2 boards which saved me time (and space since full size boards would be a tight fit in my little car). In most cases they will cut them down for you for free; however, if they do charge you, it shouldn’t be anymore than $.25 a cut which is still a good deal.

Tip: ALWAYS take the scrap/extra, if they don’t give it to you, ask for it. If you’re paying for the whole board, you should get the whole board, regardless of what they cut for you. Unless it’s just sliver sized pieces, you can use them for a variety of things at home.

Custom Art Wall

I didn’t take any pictures of the matting process, but if anyone thinks it would be helpful, I’d be happy to write up a tutorial. I have the Logan Model 301-S Compact Mat Cutter at home, which is a good model to do small scale matting. It’s inexpensive and easy to use.

Tip: Clamp the mat cutter to the table using inexpensive hardware store clamps to keep it from shifting while you are cutting. If you have a very steady hand you can buy a Hand Held Mat Cutter and use a ruler to cut the mat. Unfortunately, my hand isn’t steady enough to use this method, but others have success with it.

Custom Art Wall

Once the art was matted and framed, the last step was to get it up on the wall. Turns out that wall is really tall and my ladder is not, so it took a little creative thinking to get up high enough, but it worked. I won’t show you what I rigged up, since it was a ‘don’t try this at home kids’ trick, and I don’t want to give my mom a heart attack.

Custom Art Wall

*I fixed the wrinkling you see in the below picture.

Custom Art Wall

So much better than the oil painting.

Next up, I plan to paint the wall behind the art a shade of grey and replace the recessed canned lighting with a pendant or chandelier. 

Custom Art Wall

 

 

*Mat Cutter links are affiliates.

DIY: Heart Art

Technically I did this project for Valentines Day, but it really doesn’t have to be only for February. I think it would look adorable in a little kids room year around, in fact, it’s an easy project that kids can do with you.

Heart Art

I started out with a piece of framed art from Christmas. I had hung this over the mantle for the holidays, but wanted to use the frame for something else throughout the year and this project seemed perfect.

Step 1:

Find an empty frame. A floating frame would look really beautiful with this type of art too, the hearts would appear to be floating on your wall.

Heart Art

Step 2:

I took the Christmas Art out and replaced it with a blank sheet of white computer paper. Nothing fancy here.

Heart Art

Step 3:

Collect the rest of your supplies.

  • Heart shaped scrapbook punches (I used two different sizes)
  • Rubber Cement
  • Scrapbooking or other colored paper

Heart Art

Step 4:

Cut out a bunch of hearts from the scrapbook paper. Begin laying them out to get an idea of the design before you start gluing them down.

Heart Art

Step 5:

Start Gluing to the frame and glass using rubber cement.

This project was all about texture. I folded some hearts in half to give them a 3D look, others I left flat. Most were glued directly to the glass, while some were glued to the frame for additional dimension. The reason I glued on top of the glass, instead of laying them under, was so that I could fold them. This was my alternative to using a more expensive shadowbox.

I used the rubber cement because after February I expect to remove the hearts and use the frame for something else. This is purely temporary for this month.

Heart Art

I wanted it to look like the hearts were sweeping across the frame. There was no magic in how I laid them out, it was all by eye and how the pieces was flowing.

Heart Art

Heart Art

Step 6:

The finished piece. Add some hangers, if necessary, and hang on the wall.

Heart Art

I really love how it turned out and there is a part of me that is considering leaving it up longer than February. It also sparked my art bug again and I can’t wait to dig into my paints soon. I’m thinking the paintings in the spare bedroom may have some mixed media incorporated, perhaps some hearts…

Heart Art

Heart Art

Heart Art

Total Project Cost Breakdown:

Frame/Mat/Paper/Glass (Already Owned) = $0

Scrapbook paper (Michael’s, clearance colors) = $.19 each (I used 4 colors so it cost $.76 and I have plenty left over)

Large Heart Punch (Michael’s) = $12 (on 40% off)

Small Heart Punch (Michael’s) = $2.50 (also 40% off)

Rubber Cement (Staples) = $2.50

Total Cost: $17.76

If you are a crafter then you likely have heart shaped punches already and the project would cost only a few dollars. For anyone that likes this idea, be sure to check out your local craft store right after Valentine’s day, they will likely put heart craft items on clearance and you could purchase some for next year.

I hope everyone is having an excellent Valentine’s Day…I’ll be back later today to show you a special Valentine gift I’ve been planning.

Heart Art

I’m Feeling Inspired – Chevron

I’m a little late to the whole Chevron trend. In fact, I don’t have a single Chevron thing in my home or wardrobe. However, the art I plan on painting for the Spare Bedroom is inspired by Chevron so I’ve been doing a little research lately. These are some of my favorite finds so far.

If you follow me on Pinterest, I apologize for bombarding you yesterday with Chevrons!

 

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I’m Feeling Inspired: Word Art

I’m been really into word art lately and typography in general. I used to be drawn to simple black/white and grey designs; however, recently I’ve really found a love for colors again. Here are a few of my favorites lately…

 
 

Source: etsy.com via Addison on Pinterest

 
 
 
 

Source: etsy.com via Addison on Pinterest

 
 
 
 
 
 

Source: etsy.com via Addison on Pinterest

 
 

Source: etsy.com via Addison on Pinterest

 
 

Source: etsy.com via Addison on Pinterest

 
 
 
 
 
 

Ok, this is really more of a warning…

 

Source: imgfave.com via Addison on Pinterest

Inspiration Boards – Custom Artwork

While I do consider myself a writer, in some aspects, I’ve never really considered myself an artist. My art is in creating inspiration boards/Look Books, not painting, drawing, sculpture, etc. Ever since high school I have been pulling magazine cutouts and filling sketchbooks with collections. I call these my Look Books and they are primarily for my own fun and enjoyment.

Recently I purchased two large bulletin boards from HomeGoods, and I’ve placed one in the dining room and one in the workout room. My intention was to create some inspiration collections for both rooms in place of standard art.

It all started with two beautiful bulletin boards, each with large grey moulding. They were an excellent deal at Homegoods.

grey bulletin board

Then I started laying out some of my favorite kitchen/food cutouts for the dining room board. There really is no magic to this step, I just lay them out in a way that I find beautiful.

Inspiration Boards, Look Books

Inspiration Boards, Look Books

When crafting the books, I glue everything down. However, I wanted the opportunity to change out pictures over time and over holidays so everything on these boards is held in place with pushpins.

Bulletin Boards, Pushpins

Tip – Be a little selective with the pushpins, use just enough to hold everything in place, but you don’t want to fill the board with them. You want the focus on the pictures not the shiny little tacks.

 Inspiration Boards, Look Books

I couldn’t be happier with the finished product, I love it! From far away it looks like an interesting piece of art, but up close you have plenty of beautiful pictures to look at. It’s also a good conversation starter as well. This same method is also a great way to display your children’s artwork and everything can be changed out over the the year.

 Inspiration Boards, Look Books

 

Cost Breakdown:

Framed Bulletin Board – $25 @ Homegoods

Pushpins – $2

Magazine cutouts – Free

* if you are ever looking for cheap magazines to tear apart, check your library store. Friends of the Library stores will typically sell magazines for a dime, usually no more than a quarter.

Total Project Cost – $27