DIY: Hand Painted Welcome Sign

Good Morning, Happy Wednesday! I’m officially counting down to a very exciting weekend, so I’m happy we’ve finally hit midweek.

Since it’s May, I suppose it’s time to finally take down the Valentine theme door decorations. The cork heart was lovely, but I think it’s time for something a little less seasonal. I did do a little window shopping and couldn’t find any premade signs that I liked so I decided to make my own with a a piece of scrap wood and some paint. 

DIY Welcome Sign_1

I used a piece of scrap wood from the potting bench project, and painted it the same color used on the bench. It was a great neutral brown/grey that would compliment the post at the front door. Once it was dry, I used the interior circle of a canning jar lid, and a pencil, to draw a pattern onto the painted wood. The design looks complex; however, it’s really just two layers of side by side circles.

DIY Welcome Sign_7

DIY Welcome Sign_6

I wanted the pattern to blend into the background, so I used the same base color and lightened it with a little white paint. Then I used a small brush and painted over the pencil lines.

DIY Welcome Sign_5

I free hand painted the word ‘Welcome’ then used a few stamps to add a bit more texture. Using a VERY light touch, I stamped a few designs onto the board using black ink. This worked as a template, and I then used a dotting tool and some aqua paint to cover the stamped designs.

DIY Welcome Sign_4

A few screw eyes and some yarn made a perfect hanger.

DIY Welcome Sign_2

The wording is a little shaky, but I really love the how the sign turned out. It’s a good blend of neutral and fun, definitely something I could leave up through Spring and Summer. If you happen to have one of those fancy Silhouette cutting tools, then you could use it to create some amazing vinyl lettering.

DIY Welcome Sign_3

Since I owned the wood and paint, this project ended up being FREE. I knew there was another reason why I loved it.

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DIY Christmas Ornament 18: Paint Dipped Pinecones

I’m not sure why I leaved my favorite ornaments for last, but this is by far one of my favorites. The greatest thing about dipping pinecones in paint is that they aren’t limited to being Christmas ornaments. I can actually keep these out year round since I’ve used soft natural colors. I expect these will end up in vases and bowls throughout the house for the next 12 months.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 1:

Collect your supplies.

  • Pinecones
  • Push Pin
  • Basic Wire Ornament Hanger
  • Various Cans of House Paint
  • Paint Stir Sticks
  • Nail/Hammer
  • Paint Tray
  • Ribbon

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 2:

Using a push pin, make a hole in the pinecone.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Thread a wire ornament hanger through the hole you just made.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 3:

Set up a paint station.

Using a nail and hammer, put several holes near the sides of the paint sticks. Balance them across the paint cans. Set a paint tray underneath the paint stick to catch any paint that drips from the pinecones.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 4:

Hold onto the wire hanger and dip the pinecone into the can of paint.

Tip: Use a soft brush or towel to brush any dirt off the pinecone before dipping it. This will minimize any stray dirt that gets into the can of paint.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Be sure to dip the pinecone slowly, holding it over the paint can for a few moments to let it drain a bit.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 5:

Hang the pinecone from the holes you put in the stir stick.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Step 6:

Continue dipping all the pinecones in the paint and hang to dry.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Paint Dipped Pinecones

Step 7:

Allow the pinecones to drain/dry for at least 24 hours.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Paint Dipped Pinecones

Paint Dipped Pinecones

Step 8:

For those that you want to hang from the tree, use the hanger that is already hooked into the pinecone. For decoration, add a bow or ribbon around the hanger.

For all the rest, remove the hanger and decorate anywhere you like. The possibilities are endless.

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Paint Dipped Pinecone

Paint Dipped Pinecones

Project Cost Breakdown (per Ornament):

Pinecones (Found – Already Owned) = $0

Push Pin (Already Owned) = $0

Basic Wire Ornament Hanger (Already Owned) = $0

Various Cans of House Paint (Already Owned) = $0

Paint Stir Sticks (Already Owned/Free from Lowes) = $0

Nail/Hammer (Already Owned) = $0

Paint Tray (Already Owned) = $0

Ribbon (Already Owned) = $0

Total Project Cost: $0

 

I know that I originally said I would complete 20 ornaments; however this will be the last one of the series for this year. I have more ornaments than my little 3 foot tree will hold; and that least two will not be dry enough to share over the next few days. I hope you enjoyed the series, it’s been a blast to share it with you. If you missed any of the DIY Ornaments this year, you can see a full collection recap here.

DIY Christmas Ornament 16: Marbling

I know I’ve said it before, but this one is just too cool. With all the great holiday colors out there, the possibilities are endless. My only suggestion is to NOT use anything paint with glitter. The glitter will eventually drift to the bottom and the end result won’t look as great as you think it will. Trust me on this. Those paints also tend to be thicker which will be much harder to work with.

For this project, use a basic, inexpensive crafty paint. You could also use leftover interior paint if you have some on hand.

Marbling Ornament

Step 1:

Collect your supplies.

  • Clear Ornament
  • Craft Paint
  • Toilet Paper Tube

Marbling Ornament

Use the tube anytime you need to balance the ornament (especially important when you are taking pictures).

Remove ornament cap.

Marbling Ornament

Step 2:

Start by dripping a drop of one color into the ornament and let it drip down the side.

Marbling Ornament

Continue doing this with any additional colors you have.

Marbling Ornament

As the paint drips down the edge you want to swirl it so there are no clear parts of the ornament left. Once half the ornament is done squeeze a few drops of each color into the bottom of the ornament then swirl them around to cover the rest of the ornament.

Step 3:

Once all clear spots are covered tip the ornament upside down on the toilet paper to let any excess paint drain. Make sure to put a few paper towels under the toilet paper roll to catch the paint.

Marbling Ornament

Step 4:

Replace the ornament cap and enjoy!

This would also be a great craft to give new life to any old clear ornaments that you have. Even if they have color or designs on them, the marbling could look really awesome.

Marbling Ornament

Project Cost Breakdown (per Ornament):

Clear Ornament (Already Owned) = $0

Craft Paint (Already Owned) = $0

Toilet Paper Roll/Paper Towel (Already Owned) = $0

Total Project Cost: $0

Crafty DIY: Halloween Sign

Out of the all the holidays each year, Halloween feels the most like a crafty holiday. I always have the urge to break out the paint and scrap wood/canvas to create a fun/spooky project. This year I needed a Halloween sign to hang out by the front door.

Halloween Sign

A little paint and cheesecloth goes a long way.

Step 1:

Collect your supplies

  • 4 Wood Rectangle blocks (I used scrap wood from another project, they were about 5” x 7”)
  • Craft Paint (Orange, Green, Black, White)
  • Mummy Supplies
  • Twine
  • Paint brushes/Paper Towels/Painters Tape
  • Nails/Staple Gun/Hammer/Wood Glue

Halloween Sign

Step 2:

The first block should be painted Orange, and will later become the pumpkin.

Halloween Sign

I did 2 coats of Folk Art in 627 Tangerine. You don’t need to paint the back of the boards, but make sure you paint all sides since those will be visible.

Halloween Sign

Next Up…Mini Frankenstein.

Step 3:

Tape off the top of the block since that will be painted black.

Halloween Sign

I used Martha Stewart Craft Glitter Paint in 32169 Golden Beryl. It took 3-4 coats of the glitter in order to achieve full coverage.

Halloween Sign

Remove the tape and then fill in the top with black craft paint (I used Martha Stewart Satin in 32082 Beetle Black)

Halloween Sign

Step 4:

The last two block should be painted white. One will later become the ghost and one will be the mummy. I used white spray paint for both of these and unfortunately it was too dark in the garage to take any pictures.

You can use this tutorial on how to use Cheesecloth to make a mummy.

Using black paint, I free hand painted all the faces. You can use a pencil to sketch the design directly onto the wood first then paint over it.

Halloween Sign

Step 5:

Attach the block together using wood glue and nail.

This may go without saying, but make sure you check the thickness of the wood when selecting your nails. It was difficult to pick a size that would make it through the first block and not the second. This is why I used the wood glue, just to give a little extra hold.

Halloween Door Sign

Step 6:

Attach a piece of twine to the back, using a staple gun.

Halloween Sign

I hung the sign from a front door post that I’ll be sharing in a separate post soon, but you could also hang it from a standard door hook and it would look great.

Project Cost Breakdown:

Wood Blocks (From scraps) = $0

Craft Paints (Orange, Green Black) (Michaels) = $6

White Spray Paint (Already Owned) = $0

Mummy Supplies (Already Owned from this project) = $0

Twine (Already Owned from this project) = $0

Paint brushes/Paper Towels/Painters Tape (Already Owned) = $0

Nails/Staple Gun/Hammer/Wood Glue (Already Owned) = $0

Total Project Cost: $6

SHOWING THE LOVE:

Linking To: Between Naps On The Porch, Craft-O-Maniac, The Girl Creative, Making the World Cuter, Today’s Creative Blog, Not JUST A Housewife, Ginger Snap CraftsBlue Cricket DesignVery Merry Vintage StyleSavvy Southern StyleThe Shabby Creek Cottage, Beyond The Picket Fence, The ArtsyGirl ConnectionThe Crafty NestAddicted 2 DecoratingThe Shabby Nest,  RemodelaholicFrench Country CottageDear CreativesOhh Baby DesignsThe Not So Functional Housewife

Powder Room ReDesign

One of the things I loved most about my home when I bought it was the potential. All the bathrooms were still builder grade white. Boring, but I was so giddy about all the different possibilities. Over the past year and a half, I have completed 2 full bathrooms, 1 powder room, and the laundry room. All the bedrooms are in a stages of completion, but since bathrooms are small, it’s easy to finish them quickly. Especially since I’m not doing renovations…yet.

My favorite redesign so far has been the powder room, essentially a half bathroom which is near the living room. This is the bathroom that all guests would use since it’s in the main living area near the kitchen. I wanted it somewhat simple and rustic.

Here is the room before. The only picture I have is the one that was posted with the house listing, so it’s not great. Just imagine everything being white. White tile, white pedestal sink, white toilet. It felt a little like a small padded room.

The towel & toilet paper holder hardware was the cheapest builder grade possible. Of course the room was set with the standard ‘fancy’ oval mirror. The room has no natural light and the recessed can light provides a yellow glare, so the after pictures will seem a little dark.

Powder Room - Before

This was my inspiration picture…but really only the flowers were the inspiration. I hold the term ‘Inspiration’ loosely since the finished room looks very little like this. However, I loved the bright pop of color from the flowers and the natural wood vase. I actually think the vase is a glass vase is sitting on top of a natural wood candle holder, genius!

Apologies for no source. I think it was one of the HGTV dream houses, but I don’t have the link.

AFTER…

Powder Room - After

The first step was to buy a new mirror, and I lucked out by finding the perfect one at Homegoods, it was under $50. It instantly gave the room an upgrade look. I decided to leave the pedestal sink since it was in good condition and I also decided to leave the tile for now. I hope to change it out later.

The trash can in the corner is a small stool and Moroccan style ‘jar’, both are from Homegoods. (Seriously I spend a lot of time and money in that store).

The rug, which you can only see a bit of is from IKEA a few years ago. I’d like to change this out eventually when I find one that fits the room better. However, my favorite part of this picture is the towel hardware, which came from West Elm. It’s beautiful and rustic looking, I love it. I also purchased the Toilet Paper Holder from the same collection.

Textured Bath Hardware, Towel Ring, NickelTextured Bath Hardware, Toilet Paper Holder, Nickel

View, opposite the mirror.

Powder Room - After

The whole room really came together when I found the boxes. They are essentially overpriced wooden crates from Pottery Barn. I found them at the Pottery Barn Outlet so my wallet didn’t cry as much.

The white lantern on the floor is being used as a holder for extra toilet paper. It can hold an additional 4 rolls, so visitors (or myself) never have to worry about running out.

Powder Room - After

The accessories in/on the boxes were things that I already had around the home. Some white wash cloths that visitor can use to dry their hands. There are several candles that the make room smell lovely, as well as other knick knacks. I believe the ceramic owl was from West Elm, the Star was from Crate & Barrel Outlet, and the circle cup was from Anthropologie.

Powder Room - After

Project Cost Breakdown

Paint: Quart of Olympic Barefoot Beach $14

Mirror (Homegoods) $49

Towel Rack (West Elm) $22

Toilet Paper Hardware (West Elm) $19

Faux Orchid Plant (Homegoods) $19

Boxes (Pottery Barn Outlet) $50 ($25 each)

White Lantern (Homegoods) $29

All Other Accessories (Already Owned): $0

Total Project Cost: $202

I budgeted $200 for this room and I’m thrilled that it was so close.

SHOWING THE LOVE!

Linking to: Thrifty Decor ChickRemodelaholic , Addicted 2 Decorating, Funky Junk Interiors, Between Naps on the Porch

Pinterest Craft DIY Project – Paint Chip Keychain

I’m a little late to the game, but a few weeks back, several home design bloggers hosted a Pinterest DIY challenge. The point was to use pictures you had pinned on Pinterest to inspire a home project. I love Pinterest, and I love a challenge, but due to home & work related emergencies I wasn’t able to get everything done and posted to be part of the actual challenge, but that didn’t stop me from creating a very cool craft.

Addicted 2 Decorating created these incredibly awesome Paint Chips that can be carried with you. They are so much cooler than keeping paper paint chips in your pocket.

Source

So I set out and purchased my own supplies.

Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

I purchased everything at Michael’s, on sale and with coupons. All in all, it cost me less than $10.

Now, before I go any further,I have to say that what you are about to see should be done on a proper work surface. I was restricted to my kitchen due to some house construction work so I had to make due. In all honesty, I’m lucky I didn’t damage my kitchen countertops. This is one of the few times where I’ll say, do as I say, not as I do (for the safety of you and your countertops).

Use a workbench or other solid wood work surface. You may be drilling into this surface, so make sure it’s something you don’t mind damaging.

Indoor Temporary Workbench

Open up the wood discs that you purchased.

Wooden Discs, Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

Mark a dot near the top with marker…

Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

…then drill a hole in each disc.

Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

Sting up the drilled discs…these are your blank paint chips

Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

Next you’ll need to break out your paint.

My tip is to grab a piece of cardboard and some masking tape. You can tape the discs to the board and have a steady place to paint the chips. Once dry you’ll flip the discs and paint the other side.

Paint Chip Keychain Supplies

I used some of my beading supplies to cut down the chain and secured it with a safety-pin. This was my fastener of choice, but another option is to use the fan chain shown above.

Paint Chip Key Chain, Keychain

After you paint all the chips, you’ll have a beautiful key chain with your paint colors that you can keep with you while shopping for furniture or any other reason.

Paint Chip Key Chain, Keychain

On the back of each chip I’ve written the paint type, color, and room it was used.

Paint Chip Key Chain, Keychain

Have you attempted any DIY projects you saw on Pinterest?

SHOWING THE LOVE!

Linking to: Polly Want a Crafter, Ohh Baby Designs, 5 Minutes Just For Me

Brass to Bronze

Gold is not my favorite color, or maybe I should say, Builder Brass is not my favorite color. It’s a common color of accessories/fixtures in many builder grade homes. Even though I didn’t purchase my home brand new, many of the builder grade amenities were still in place. The previous owner didn’t do many any upgrades.

When I moved in, one of the first projects I completed was to change out all the interior and exterior door knobs. They were a hideous mix of gold, brass, and silver. In fact there was a weird mix of indoor and outdoor knobs throughout the house. One of the bedroom had a key lock door knob on the inside of the room, it was strange. So my dad purchased a house full of door knobs as a housewarming gift and I spent the next week re-knobbing 15+ doors. I picked the oil rubbed bronze knobs and it looks incredible. Such a small difference gave the house a whole new fresh look. I only wish I had a picture of the ugly doorknobs so you could see the difference. I only have a picture of new knobs, which in my opinion, is a much better look.

Oil Rubbed Bronze Door Knobs, White Interior Doors

(Yes, that is green carpet. Also a gift from the previous owner. Hopefully I can change it out in the next year)

Now the doors look great, but all the closets still have shiny gold/brass, and it makes me sad.

Brass Closet Door Hardware

Brass Closet Door Hardware

First step was to tape off the area. I didn’t want bronze closet doors or walls. I used this tutorial for taping around curved items, it’s genius!

 Brass Closet Door Hardware, Circular Tape for Painting 

Then added some Kraft paper to block off the rest of the area, since I sometimes go a little wild with spray paint. Now, I know I could have removed both closet doors, taken them down the backyard and painted them outside, which is always preferable with spray paint. However, all the doors are on the 3rd floor and getting through the narrow circular staircase was going to be a challenge, not impossible, but very difficult since I’m doing this project on my own. I really just needed a second person if I was going to take everything downstairs. So I opened up all the windows in the bedroom, kicked the dog downstairs, and grabbed a big fan to help with ventilation.

 Brass Closet Hardware, Kraft Paper Taped up for Painting

After two coats of paint, I am no longer sad. The oil rubbed bronze is beautiful!

 Oil Rubbed Bronze Spray Paint, White Closet Doors

Sometimes it’s the littlest things that makes the biggest impact. 

Oil Rubbed Bronze Spray Paint, White Closet Doors

 Oil Rubbed Bronze Spray Paint, White Closet Doors